Category Archives: DIY Projects

One Room Challenge: Week 5

One Room Challenge: Week 5

Week 1 | Week 2 | Week 3 | Week 4Week 5Week 6

Welcome to ‘Week 5’ of the One Room Challenge! If you need to catch up with this 6-week project, feel free to click those links above, although you’ll notice that the ‘Week 6’ link isn’t active yet since the reveal doesn’t go live until next week. Today, I’m sharing a few quick sneak peeks of the art and lighting we chose for the room. A lot of it we already had on hand, which helped us save a ton of money, but we also took this project as an excuse to refurbish one piece in particular that had been lying half-finished in our basement for years—yes, years.

One Room Challenge: Week 5

One Room Challenge: Week 5

The hanging light you see above has actually been in our collection since we moved into town in 2015. I purchased it for $65 from a secondhand store in Charlottesville thinking I’d be able to find the perfect spot for the light after we got settled and all unpacked. Well, as it turns out, I should have taken my time getting to know our new house before purchasing anything new because there really wasn’t a great place to put the hard-wired pendant light.

Late last year I went so far as to put the light in my car to take to Goodwill, but I never did have the heart to hand it over for donation. The cool mid-century shape and unique brass and wood finishes really stole my heart. So, I did what I always do when I’m ready to throw my hands up in defeat over a project: I begged my dad for help.

It took him a few weeks to get the lamp all sorted out (and, I think, quite a bit of stress…sorry, Dad!), but he really managed to bring it back to life. He gave it a deep, thorough clean, and he also reworked the fixture so that it went from a hard-wired light to a plug-in pendant. All I needed to do afterward was hang it from the ceiling to finish, and now we’re in love with how it looks swinging in the corner of our bedroom. I’m so excited for you to see it in the full reveal next week.

One Room Challenge: Week 5

One Room Challenge: Week 5

One Room Challenge: Week 5

Now, how about that art? The vintage framed painting you see here is a $50 piece I picked up at the Williamsburg Antique Mall the last time I was in town. I haven’t mentioned it here on the blog yet because I was looking for the perfect place to hang it, and that turned out to be right above my dresser. My sister isn’t a big fan of the frame, but I love how it feels sort of 1950s—like you’d see it in the sitting room of a home like the one in Father of the Bride. The small engraved artist’s name on the bottom is another favorite detail that makes me want to keep the painting and frame together forever.

The other pieces in the room are in the same sketchy, abstract style—a watercolor (that’s, unfortunately, no longer available online, but is by this artist in case you’d like to know), an oversized abstract pulled from my office, and a leafy line drawing that was once up in our living room. Keeping our art collection down to just four framed pieces is a new record for me, but our brand new faux paneling really deserves to steal the show anyway.

One Room Challenge: Week 5

One Room Challenge: Week 5

Feel free to leave your thoughts about our progress in the comments below, and then hop over to the One Room Challenge event website hosted by Linda, of Calling It Home, for more design inspiration from my fellow guest participants. I also wanted to mention that I found a way to give you guys the opportunity to see the room before the reveal goes live on the blog next Thursday. Click here to sign up for the Dream Green DIY newsletter, and then keep an eye on your inbox next Wednesday for an exclusive pre-tour of the space. I can’t wait for you to see!

One Room Challenge: Week 1

*Media Partner House Beautiful | TM by ORC
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DIY Decorative Air Dry Clay Wall Bells

DIY Decorative Air Dry Clay Wall Bells

Remember yesterday when I unveiled my latest collection of handmade pottery? Well, it turns out that you don’t have to have a potter’s wheel in order to make pretty clay works of art. Case in point, I worked with my editor at Hunker to come up with a way to make a set of decorative clay wall balls using inexpensive air dry clay as a base material.

This tutorial is geared toward those of you who might not have access to a pottery studio so you can create one-of-a-kind art right from your home. I actually made these bells at our coffee table one afternoon, so you don’t have to feel pressured to find a fancy spot to get your crafting on.

DIY Decorative Air Dry Clay Wall Bells

The main aspect of this project that I encourage you to keep in mind is patience. Since you’re not relying on a kiln to pull the moisture from your clay, you have to wait for the clay to dry out on its own. That said, these clay bells require very little hands-on time to make.

Hop over to Hunker here to learn how to make your own, and please feel free to leave any questions down below. I really want you guys to feel like you have all the tools and instruction you need to make this project a reality in your own home, so fire away in the comments with any reservations you might have! I’m always here to help.

DIY Decorative Air Dry Clay Wall Bells

*If you’d like to see what a set of decorative clay wall bells could look like using a wheel, hop back to yesterday’s post to see the set I made at our local pottery studio.
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What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

Remember when I signed up on a whim for a wheel-throwing pottery class earlier this year? I loved it so much that I signed up for a second class! Actually, at the risk of giving too much away, I signed up for yet another class to learn more techniques and get more practice in, but that’s a story for another day. Today, I wanted to share a look at the collection of things I made in my second pottery class, so keep scrolling for the story behind each bowl, plate, vessel, and bell (yes, bell!).

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

If you caught the first installment of this story back in March, then you know all about the 6-week course, which was hosted by a local studio here in town called Make Waynesboro. It was taught once again by pro potter, Sherri Raffaele, and I had so much fun watching her demos and getting to know her a little bit better, too.

A lot of teachers can be really intimidating, especially when they’re so good at their craft, but Sherri was wonderful about offering guidance when asked and giving us room to experiment (and mess up) on our own. I was so sad to hear that she won’t be teaching any more classes at the studio this season, but hope she and I can stay in touch.

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

Anyway, this second class was the perfect time for me to try building on the basic techniques I had learned in my first class, and it was also around this time that I got hooked on pottery videos online. I now watch them during my lunch break, when I can’t sleep at night, before getting up out of bed in the morning—I’m kind of obsessed. That being said, I think it was the avid video-watching that gave me the confidence to try making other types of shapes, like the vase you see above.

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

Another small triumph was my first successful bowl. It’s far from perfect, but our class this week actually had a great discussion about how imperfection isn’t something to be disappointed in when it comes to handmade things like wheel-thrown pottery. Those uneven edges and fingerprints just prove that it really is one-of-a-kind.

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

This go-around, since I was feeling a little more confident, I mentioned to my family that I could take requests. My dad was quick to respond with his vote for a bonsai pot, so I did my best to create a wide low bowl for him that could be used for potting. I’m not so sure that it’ll work (clay shrinks so much after it’s fired, and this might be too small after all), but it was fun to try a new footed shape that I hadn’t experimented with before.

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

Now for those bells I mentioned. I’ve been aching to make my own decorative clay wall bells ever since spotting this collection in Emily Henderson’s living room, so I thought maybe I’d give it a go in pottery class. Somehow, I think it actually worked out pretty well, although I panicked during the glazing class and rushed the black spotted design maybe a bit too much. Check back on the blog tomorrow if you’d like to make your own version of these clay wall bells because I actually managed to make them using air dry clay, too!

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

Here’s another bowl I somehow managed to eke out. I’m still so desperate to nail an evergreen color with my glaze, but have yet to master the combination. Apparently, you can layer yellow over black glaze to get the look, but this bowl isn’t quite the color I was going for. Maybe next time!

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

This was supposed to be a mug, but I ended up accidentally trimming off the bottom—oops. So, I decided to turn it into a candle luminary instead by carving holes in the sides for light to show through. The gap in the back was another unfortunate trimming mishap, but I’m just so attached to these things that I can’t throw anything away. Let’s just pretend it was intentional for slipping a candle in from the back, shall we?

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

This milk creamer is something I’m glad I committed to. I’m not so sure that I got the proportions right (read: I’m definitely sure it’s not right), but I love the tapered shape and the side handle. From the very beginning, I’ve focused all of my decorative carving work on leafy plant shapes, and I especially love the more modern design of this one. I can’t take any credit for it, though. I just find shapes online that I like and try to give them my own flair when I translate them into clay.

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

John’s request was a bigger, heavier spoon rest by the stove since he does all of the cooking in our house, so I made him a small appetizer-size plate to do the deed. I’m really loving the two-tone look, and am especially drawn to the white and brown palette. Isn’t it cool how the brown really picks up on the variations in the clay? It’s kind of like wood grain. I love it!

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

Finally, if you’ve stuck with me to the end, we have this little match holder and striker. The intent was to have a ribbed triangular vessel that could hold oversized matches, and you could strike the matches across the ribs to light them. Unfortunately, while I love the look of the custom white matches I bought on Etsy, they don’t seem to light up using the piece of pottery I made. I think I need to use “Strike Anywhere” matches or something, but for now this at least looks pretty, I think.

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

As I mentioned, I’m taking a third class right now, and might even sign up for a fourth. I described this in more detail after my first class, but there’s just something so enriching about being back in an art studio. I love getting my hands dirty, and it’s so great to get out of this house and interact with other creative people. I’m completely and utterly hooked.

Let me know in the comments below which piece is your favorite from the collection, and please feel free to shout out if you think I should open a shop to sell these pieces. I’ve gone so far as to reserve an Etsy shop name, but I’m afraid to take the leap. At this point, a little push or even a sign of interest from one or two folks could be all I need to make my would-be shop a reality. Shop or not, though, these classes have made me so happy, and I’m excited to stick with it—even just for my own mental wellbeing!

What I Made In My Second Pottery Class

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DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint

*This post has been sponsored KILZ®. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

As a lover of all things mid-century, it’s probably not too surprising to hear that I also love wood paneling. I cringe whenever I watch TV designers ripping out original paneling in retro homes, because I think that wood grain adds so much richness and beauty to a space. Of course, there are exceptions and not all paneling is created equal, but I generally am on the side of “Team Paneling,” and could never imagine getting rid of our own real wood paneled walls downstairs.

To help me celebrate this love for paneling, I teamed up with KILZ® to try my hand at getting the look of paneling without heavy duty power tools. Scroll on to find out how I gave one wall in our master bedroom a wood grain finish using nothing but paint, tape, and brushes—no, really!

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

Step 1

Start your painting project off on the right foot first thing by prepping your wall with primer. I’ve skipped this step before, and always (always) regret it because primer helps cover old paint colors, plus it gives your top coat a nice foundation to “stand on.” Point is, learn from my past mistake and get yourself a bucket of KILZ 2® Latex Primer.

If, like us, you only plan to paint faux paneling on one wall, you won’t need much primer, but I would still suggest springing for the full gallon. You can order it online from Walmart like I did so it comes right to your door, no hassle, and I wouldn’t be surprised if you end up using the entire gallon on projects around your house throughout the year ahead—I know I will. They also carry the paint in store if you prefer to see materials in person. Click here to find your closest Walmart.

Before painting, though, make sure to use painter’s tape to mask off all four edges around your chosen wall. Press the tape down firmly with your fingertips or a plastic straightedge, and then you’re ready to paint. If you need more than one coat of primer to cover the old wall color, make sure you wait until the primer is dry between coats before painting on another layer.

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

Step 2

When the primer is finished and completely dry, it’s time to move on to what I’m calling the under color. This is referring to the dark color that shows in between your faux wood panels—think of it sort of like the “grout.” I already had a can of KILZ Complete Coat® in “Rebel” leftover from this DIY project, so I went ahead and used that (but, like the primer, you can also grab this online from Walmart!). The cool thing about KILZ Complete Coat® paint is that it’s built for both indoor and outdoor use, so if I manage to come up with a third idea for this leftover paint, I know just what to grab from our paint shelves in the basement.

The almost-black paint went on like a dream, and, since I just needed the color to show in small doses between my faux wood panels, I only needed one coat of paint. It’s okay if your under color isn’t completely uniform. In fact, a little variation helps it look more realistic in the end.

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

Step 3

Now you can turn your attention to masking out lines for the panel edges. To do so in our own room, I used a ruler to make small pencil marks every 5 and a half inches along both the ceiling and the floor. Then, I followed this sequence over and over until I had masked out the entire wall:

  1. Climb a ladder or step stool and, without cutting or tearing it, unroll a long section of 1/2-inch painter’s tape.
  2. Press the end alongside the pencil mark at the ceiling.
  3. Get down off your ladder, unrolling the tape longer as you go.
  4. Press the other end of the long tape strip beside the pencil mark you made at floor level.
  5. Tear the tape off the roll.
  6. Use your fingers or a plastic straightedge to press the tape firmly to the wall, all the way from floor to ceiling.
  7. Repeat until you’ve covered the wall with even tape lines.

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

Step 4

Time for your faux panels! To get the look of rich wood grain, I used a combination of KILZ Complete Coat® paint in “Yule Log” and “Ancient Spice.” First, I cut in around the edges of the wall using the lighter color (“Yule Log”) and then covered the rest of the wall in the same color using a roller. Just one coat did the job to give me a relatively uniform—but still natural—wood look. KILZ® suggests waiting 2 hours to dry and 4 hours to recoat.

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

Step 5

Now for “Ancient Spice,” which is just slightly darker than “Yule Log.” First, I dipped a cheap bristle brush into the can of mixed “Ancient Spice” paint, and then I slashed the paint right over top of the “Yule Log” panels in a thin vertical motion. The more random and erratic your brush strokes, the better since your goal is to make the paint look like a wood grain, which has a lot of natural variation.

You can see in the mid-motion photo I snapped below that I slashed the paint right over the masking tape, and that I left a good bit of the lighter paint color showing through. I know it might seem like a tall order, but do your best not to overthink it. Throw on a podcast or some good music, and then just let your arm do all the work.

The really good news for those of you who might be feeling a little intimidated about trying this yourselves is that these two paint colors are very forgiving together. Once they dry, there’s only slight variation, so any areas that you might have under- or over-worked will be hard to notice. I included a GIF animation below to demonstrate what steps 3-6 look like in case you’re more of a visual learner.

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

Step 6

Before your paint dries, go ahead and remove all of the masking tape—both the panel lines and the tape you used to mask off the edges of the wall itself. You’ll want to pull the tape back over itself slowly at a 45-degree angle while the paint is still a little wet, that way you don’t end up accidentally peeling away dry paint with the tape. Discard the tape, let the paint dry completely for a few hours, and then you’re done.

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

I honestly was so surprised by how well this project turned out. Sure, I tend to have pretty high hopes for any DIY project I try at home, but my vision for this one seemed a little loftier than normal. Every single person I explained the project to gave me a look like, “I’ll believe it when I see it,” and I even started second-guessing myself a little bit before finally cracking open a can of paint.

Turns out those fears were unfounded across the board, though, because our faux paneled wall looks pretty darn believable (if I do say so myself). I remember texting mid-progress photos to my husband saying, “This might actually work!” and you can imagine the giant smile that materialized on my face when he responded with an almost-immediate, “Wow! That’s wood paneling!” Point is, you, too, can easily have the look of mid-century wood paneling in your own home—no power tools required.

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

Check back here over the course of the next few weeks as I continue making over our master bedroom with even more of our favorite varieties of KILZ® paint from Walmart, but in the meantime I want to know…Where would you add faux wood look paneling? Leave a comment describing your room below!

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

DIY Faux Mid-Century Paneling Using Paint | dreamgreendiy.com + @kilzbrand #ad

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DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder

*This post was sponsored by National Hardware

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

One of my very favorite parts about crafting on a regular basis is that each project teaches me to get more and more creative with materials. I love rethinking supplies to give them uses that go beyond their more traditional purpose (think: wallpaper used as a drawer liner, or embroidery hoops turned into a jewelry organizer).

So, when National Hardware reached out with a challenge to use their screw rings in a crafty home décor project, I was quick to accept—we’re talking lightening fast. Scroll on to see how I turned a simple brass screw ring into a DIY hanging air plant holder, including a brand new video that shows the process in action!

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

Here’s What You’ll Need:

  • Brass screw ring
  • Twine
  • Scissors
  • Mini glass globe
  • Pebbles or small rocks
  • Air plant
  • Acrylic paint
  • Plastic paint palette
  • Paint brush
  • Round foam pouncer
  • Stencil
  • Drill and drill bit
  • Wall anchor
  • Hammer

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

Step 1

Cut about 3-4 feet of twine off the spool, depending on how low you want your air plant to hang. I always tend to cut more off than I need since it’s easier to trim off excess at the end as opposed to having to recut a longer length of twine. Run the twine through the top of the glass globe (I did this twice for added strength), and double knot the twine at the ends.

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

Step 2

Fill the globe with pebbles or small rocks, and then push an air plant into the globe, aiming the stem end down into the rocks. I actually used a faux air plant since I tend to have bad luck keeping real plants alive.

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

Step 3

Next, it’s time to mix your paint. You can choose any type of accent color you’d like for the stenciled shape, but since this design calls for the stencil to be right behind the screw ring, I decided to try my best to match the brass color of the ring itself for a seamless look.

I started with the proportions of paint you see in the photo above—tiny dots of red, blue, and black, alongside large dollops of white and yellow. After mixing the colors with a paint brush, I was left with the color you see in the photo just below. To make it match the brass ring just a little bit better, I added another dot of blue and another hearty squeeze of yellow paint. The resulting color is seen in the photo two images down.

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

Step 4

Now, go ahead and stick your stencil to the wall right where you’d like your screw ring to be. Our retro starburst stencil came from Etsy here, but you can use any shape you’d like. Press the edges down firmly with your fingertips, then use a drill and drill bit to put a hole in the wall toward the center of your stencil. Hammer a wall anchor into place, and then use a round foam pouncer to cover the entire area (anchor, and all) with the paint you mixed in Step 3.

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

Step 5

Remove the stencil while it’s still wet, then allow the paint to dry for about an hour. Finish by screwing the screw ring into the anchor in the wall, and knot the globe through the ring by feeding the tail of the twine through the screw ring, looping the globe through, and pulling down. You can see this step demonstrated in action in the video I share next.

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

Click ‘Play’ above to watch the entire process, or visit our YouTube channel to see the tutorial in action over there. This turned out to be such a fun project to work on, especially since it gave me an excuse to think creatively about how to use a screw ring at home. Before I knotted the air plant holder to the screw ring, my mind was racing with thoughts of using the stencil and ring to create a DIY drawer pull (sort of like this). Can you picture it in the shot two photos up?

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

Big thanks to the folks at National Hardware for partnering with me on this fun project, and feel free to shout out your own ideas for repurposing a brass screw ring in the comments below!

DIY Screw Ring Hanging Air Plant Holder | dreamgreendiy.com + @nationalhrdware #ad

*I received payment and free product from Spectrum Brands to produce this project and post. The opinions expressed here are my own. Thank you for your continued support of the brands who support Dream Green DIY.

**Don’t forget to sign up for the Dream Green DIY newsletter! The next issue hits everyone’s inboxes tomorrow, and includes our family recipe for banana bread. You can sign up to get on the newsletter email list here.

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DIY Free-standing Plywood Magazine Rack

DIY Free-standing Plywood Magazine Rack

As a person who loves to constantly change things around at home, I’m always drawn to décor that can be classified as “free-standing.” Anything that doesn’t have to be nailed, bolted, or screwed into the wall is my favorite thing because I know that, without fail, I’ll get the sudden urge to move it from one room to the next in order to keep things feeling fresh. Let’s just say that I pretty much keep the drywall patching industry in business with how often I have to fill holes in our walls.

So, when I pitched an idea for a free-standing plywood shelf to my editor at Hunker, I had my fingers (and toes) crossed that she would be into the idea, too. My vision was for a rack that, first of all, was super simple to build whether you have woodworking skills or not, but also was easy to move from spot to spot within any home. As I’m sure you guessed from the existence of this post, my editor was all for it, and today I have the happy task of launching the official tutorial over on the Hunker website.

DIY Free-standing Plywood Magazine Rack

DIY Free-standing Plywood Magazine Rack

I’ve already had the shelf situated in our family room and, later, our bedroom, but I have an inkling that it might just end up in my office soon enough. It’s just so simple to grab and go, and the display possibilities are pretty wide open, too. I didn’t intend for there to be room on the shelf for anything other than pretty magazines, but when I leaned it in place after the glue had dried, I realized there was just enough room for things like framed art and even a small bud vase or two.

Hop over to Hunker now to get all of the DIY design details and know that this is one woodworking project that even the most beginner of crafters can build at home—no saw required!

DIY Free-standing Plywood Magazine Rack

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DIY Rickrack Striped Table Runner

*This post is sponsored by Oriental Trading

DIY Rickrack Striped Table Runner

I have to be honest…I never thought I’d find myself working with rickrack trim in my craft studio, but that’s what I love so much about working for Oriental Trading—the brand challenges me to pick up tools and materials that maybe I wouldn’t have considered before, and I always end up having a blast in the process.

Case in point, rickrack trim. I think I’ve always automatically considered this fabric material a bit more appropriate for kids, but then my fellow “Supply of the Month” bloggers and I were each tasked with producing a grownup craft using the trim. Well, several weeks of experimenting later, and my tutorial for a DIY Rickrack Striped Table Runner is live and (I think!) proves that this medium can be made to look sophisticated and fun.

DIY Rickrack Striped Table Runner

As a gal always on the hunt for the most budget-friendly options available when it comes to any kind of shopping or decorating, I especially love how inexpensive this project turned out to be, too. A little trim goes a long way when remaking this striped rickrack pattern, so you can rest assured that your table runner won’t bust your decorating budget. Click over to Oriental Trading’s Fun365 website here to see the full shopping list and DIY tutorial, then let me know in the comments below which colors you would use.

DIY Rickrack Striped Table Runner

*Don’t forget to sign up for the Dream Green DIY newsletter! The next issue hits everyone’s inboxes Wednesday, and includes a roundup of 10 DIY bridal shower gift ideas inspired by spring. You can sign up to get on the newsletter email list here.
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DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups

*This post was sponsored by Tuesday Morning

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

Today, I’m teaming up for another home décor project in collaboration with Tuesday Morning (see our holiday-themed styling story here!). If you’re new to the brand, each store carries a huge selection of discounted home goods and accessories from all sorts of brands and designer names. We’re talking unique, handpicked items from all over the world—a fact that ended up directly inspiring the global DIY project you’re about to see.

I tend to go into any home goods shopping excursion with at least a general idea of what I’m going for. I’m currently working on a big spring makeover project (more on that tomorrow), so I made sure to have a mood board of inspiration images and dream products ready to reference on my phone as I headed into our local Tuesday Morning.

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

With my mood board close at hand, I started pulling together a cart’s worth of accessories all within the warm, earthy color palette I had planned. Then, I paused for a moment (right there in the aisle!) to take stock of all the pieces I had grabbed. As I looked through all of the things I had chosen, I immediately picked up on an eclectic Moroccan theme. Without really meaning to, I had grabbed a pretty intentional-looking collection of wood toned pieces, hand-stitched textiles, and lots of accents in a rust and evergreen color palette.

My eyes kept going back specifically to a trio of mini wood cups that I had grabbed on a whim from the kitchen aisle (each priced in-store for $2.99, compared to $6 full price). I felt like they needed just a hint of color to help them fit within the rest of what I had chosen, so I made a pitstop in the crafting aisle to stock up on paint and brushes.

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

Once home, I grabbed a roll of painter’s tape that I already had in my toolbox, and then I got to work masking off the areas I wanted to paint on the wood cups. The photo above is a demonstration of what to do with your painter’s tape and what not to do with your painter’s tape.

Rather than using one long piece of tape to mask off half the cup (as seen on the bottom cup), use lots of tiny pieces of torn tape (as seen on the upper cup). This method allows you to have more control over the line down the center. See how the cup toward the bottom of the photo is curved way out to the side, whereas the line on the upper cup is much straighter and cuts the cup right down the middle in a diagonal line? The only way to control that line is with smaller pieces of tape.

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

Next, I mixed acrylic paint in three colors—orange, olive green, and a striking solid black—to match the throw blanket from India that I bought at Tuesday Morning (snagged for $29.99, compared to $99.99!). I painted each of the three cups using the colors, making sure to rinse and dry my paint brush between each coat and each color. In the end, I did two coats, allowing the cups to dry for 30 minutes in between each layer of paint.

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

As soon as the final coat of paint had been brushed on, I went ahead and removed the painter’s tape. It’s important to peel back the tape while the paint is still wet to avoid peeling the dried paint off with the tape. After that, I was all done and ready to fill the cups with jewelry.

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

So, what do you think of my global DIY painted cups? I love that they were directly inspired by the handmade Indian blanket I chose—stay tuned for lots more behind this room makeover in the coming weeks.

My favorite part about shopping at Tuesday Morning is that the store carries a massive variety of pieces to choose from, so you can easily go into the store and handpick the pieces that speak to you, and you alone. Tell me in the comments below what colors you would have chosen for this painted wood DIY craft.

DIY Two Tone Painted Wood Jewelry Cups | dreamgreendiy.com #ad #TuesdayMorningFinds

*All of the jewelry I chose to display in today’s post came from small business owners, as per my spring challenge. The large gold statement earrings are from Sarah Hearts, the ring is by Virginie Millefiori, the square earrings are from Darling Boutique by a designer called Dinosaur Toes, and both the tassel earrings and beaded necklace are from Natalie Borton.

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DIY Leather Handled Vase

DIY Leather Handled Vase

If you’ve been following along on the blog for any length of time, you might remember that I used to work as a freelance writer for eHow. That partnership was such a fun way for me to get creative with practical home maintenance projects (like this one), plus I did a lot of wood-working for eHow, too. As with all things freelance, though, it wasn’t a permanent full-time role, and I wrapped up my work for the team in August of 2016 with this tutorial for a DIY Mid-Century Inspired Paint Chip Wall Art Print.

The good news is that I’m excited to announce I’ve reconnected with the editorial team I used to work with over at eHow, and this time I’m creating content for a brand new-to-me site: Hunker. My first story just went live for them, so I wanted to redirect you over to the Hunker website to see the step-by-step guide for creating your own DIY Leather Handled Vase.

This project was a really fun one to work on, especially since the folks at Hunker are big champions of my shift toward a more neutral, nature-inspired palette. Stay tuned for lots of exciting DIY tutorials between Hunker and me very soon, and thanks (as always) for supporting the brands who support me and who help keep Dream Green DIY running!

DIY Leather Handled Vase

*Have you responded to our 2018 reader survey yet? Click here to submit your responses and enter to win a $25 Amazon gift card. The contest ends tonight at midnight.
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Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

I can’t believe I can finally say this…but we’re done with our upstairs bathroom makeover! As with most of our renovations throughout this retro ranch, we’ve had to take things one step and one process at a time. This is mostly thanks to a tiny budget, but it also requires a heck of a lot of time and inconvenience to makeover a room (especially a bathroom), so we’ve found that taking things one small project at a time helps the makeover ease its way into reality without forcing us to live through a cloud of dust.

Scroll on for the full story behind our bathroom upgrades (complete with all the before and after pictures your little design-loving hearts can handle), and find out how we managed to retain a lot of the mid-century charm within our small budget.

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

First, we have to go back to the beginning when this room was in all its purple glory. The previous homeowners had updated things here and there, but it was clear that the room hadn’t been touched within the last decade. This bathroom is considered the main one, serving all three bedrooms and the top floor as a whole. We do have a lower level bath, but this is the one used almost exclusively by guests and visitors, so we were anxious to make it look more modern without having to gut the entire thing.

As for what we couldn’t (or, at least, didn’t want) to change, that included the tile floor, which is super solid and in decent shape, as well as the wood vanity and already-functional footprint of the room. We had planned to keep both the purple toilet and the purple tub because we thought they added such unique character to the room, but if you remember, we very spontaneously needed to replace the purple toilet last year (details here). The purple tub though? It’s here to stay until it literally falls apart—fingers crossed that never happens because it’s a beast.

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

One of the very first projects we did was rip out the busy floral wallpaper. My mom came to help me remove the old wallpaper, and then I repainted the room a soft white color. I also replaced the mirror with a new round one from Target, and added a new white waffle shower curtain to make the room feel even bigger and brighter. We lived with those updates (all of which tallied up to maybe $150 total!) for about a year before tackling our first major break-into-the-wall change: the shower and tub fixtures.

As you can see in the photos above, the old silver knobs had done their time, plus they were leaky and rusty. Not a pretty picture (literally). So we worked with a local plumber to switch the old fixtures out for new gold ones. The plumbers left that gaping hole in the wall after fixing things up, so my dad came to help us re-wall and re-tile the surround to a smooth white finish. You can read lots more about that project here.

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Another project you might remember is that I removed the dated drop ceiling tiles that always made the room feel a lot smaller than it actually was. With the old drop ceiling gone and fresh modern lighting put in its place, we had finally reached the moment for the final major finishing touch: a brand new sink, faucet, and granite countertop. That was put in just a week and a half ago, and has completely transformed the space.

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

I always knew that I wanted to continue the same white-flecked granite that we put in the kitchen and lower level bathroom here in the upstairs bathroom. The consistent granite helps the whole 1,900-square-foot house feel more cohesive from room to room, and it also gave me the opportunity to have another gold faucet installed to match the one we put in the shower.

One last-minute change I asked our countertop pro to do was add a rectangular sink to the order. He happened to mention at our measure appointment that he could do a rectangular sink, but that it would cost a little more money since it required more labor on his part. At the time, I just shook my head and said that we were fine with the standard round sink, but then I kept second guessing myself after he left.

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

It was around this time that I got hooked on old episodes of HGTV’s Fixer Upper on Hulu, and that’s when I noticed that Joanna Gaines was putting rectangular sinks in almost all of the bathrooms I happened to see in the episodes. I talked it over with John who agreed that it could be a cool design feature, so I called up our countertop guy to adjust the order.

Now that it’s in place, the rectangular sink is easily my favorite thing about the makeover (the swanky gold faucet is a close second favorite). I think that edgy sink makes the room feel a little more modern, plus I love how the shape of it mimics the rectangular room itself. The detail is a small one, but the kind that has major impact on the finished look of the room—at least I think so! What do you think?

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

SOURCES: Sink faucet, shower head, tub fixtures, gold cabinet pulls, granite countertop, round mirror, hanging pendant light, macrame hanger and faux hanging plant, waffle weave shower curtain (the rug and artwork are vintage)

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

I worked hard to carry that metallic gold finish throughout the rest of the room with the round gold mirror, vintage gold-framed artwork, gold cabinet hardware, pendant light, and even the rust-colored vintage rug I bought off eBay. Now the room finally feels pulled together and finished, and I’m more anxious than ever to finish up our lower level bathroom renovation.

In case you were wondering about the budget and final tally of the space (I’m always so interested to hear other people talk budget with their own reno reveals!), the countertop cost $500, the rewiring of the electrical in the ceiling was about $150, I spent maybe $200 on accessories and lights throughout the room, and the new plumbing cost roughly $1,000. We were lucky that the gold fixtures themselves were kindly given to us by Delta for past reviews on the blog. The plumbing was obviously the most expensive investment, but keep in mind that the number I mentioned got us all new plumbing in both the shower and sink, plus a brand new toilet installed.

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

Although I am definitely, definitely calling this room “done,” there is a part of me that would like to change out the floor to something more modern and eye-catching. The other part of me, though, wants nothing to do with that beast of a project, plus the mosaic tile floor is solid and not obtrusive. I just have to keep refreshing the dingy grout with white paint to make it look brand new again. Happily, that’s a chore I don’t mind doing a couple times a year as long as it means I can keep the sledge hammers away.

So, what do you think of our makeover? Is there something you would have done differently? If you have any questions about sources or about the renovation process, shout them out in the comments below.

Revealing Our Madeover Retro Bathroom

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