Category Archives: DIY Projects

DIY Swing Arm Blanket Ladder

DIY Swing Arm Blanket Ladder

There’s still time to vote for Dream Green DIY in the crafting category of this year’s Design Blog Awards with Domino Magazine! DGD is one of five finalists in the contest, and you can vote once a day (no account required) now through September 23. Thank you so much for your support!

Who else is extra pumped for the official kick-off to fall this weekend? I can hardly wait to put out all of the ceramic pumpkins, fall-scented candles, and autumn-themed hand soap bottles I’ve been hoarding as we lead up to the cold weather season. Another thing I love to pull out this time of year? Blankets—and lots of them. If you’re in the same boat, then I have a feeling you’re going to love today’s DIY project: a handmade swing arm blanket holder that you can make for just $30.

DIY Swing Arm Blanket Ladder

DIY Swing Arm Blanket Ladder

Now, I’ve made many a DIY ladder in my day to hold things like magazines and, of course, throw blankets, but this design takes “simplified” to a whole new level. If you can use a handheld drill and tie a knot, you can definitely make this one at home on your own. I made this blanket ladder all by myself one afternoon in our living room, and couldn’t possibly love the laid back, practical vibes more.

Hop over to Hunker here for the full tutorial, and let me know in the comments below what you’re most looking forward to for fall, be it wool blankets, pumpkin-flavored treats, or copious amounts of autumn candles.

DIY Swing Arm Blanket Ladder

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The Lighting Project I Wish I Never Did

As something of a “pro DIY-er,” it should be expected that things won’t always go my way. That’s the nature of hand-making things, right? At least that’s what I’m currently telling myself to calm my humiliation over today’s project fail. In all truthfulness, the project isn’t a complete failure, but it’s definitely something I wish I had never started, and I wanted to be as candid with you guys as possible in case you want to either learn from my mistakes or skip the project altogether.

I’m getting ahead of myself, though. What am I even talking about? Well, this story is all about the brand new café string lights I hung last month in our sunroom. The idea was simple: line the bare ceiling in our sunroom with delicate light bulbs so we can enjoy the ambiance come fall when we start spending more time out in the three-seasons room.

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

As it stood before tackling this string light project, our sunroom didn’t have much electrical light to speak of. We had a plug-in fixture dangling over the dining table, but that was about it other than a few table lamps. Suffice it to say, our sunroom was a pretty dark space in the evening, and that’s what we consider to be the space’s prime time, so I wanted to fix that before cooler days arrive next month.

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

The easy choice—or what I thought would be easy—was to hang a few strands of plug-in café lights up above. This would allow me to skip the process of hard-wiring anything into the ceiling, and I could also use lights that were specially formulated for outdoor use since the sunroom doesn’t have insulation or temperature control.

So, I hopped online early last month and ordered myself several strands of string lights from Amazon. I bought them in white thinking that they would blend a little bit better into the ceiling, and I’m happy to report that they do. They’re pretty inconspicuous when installed against a white (or, in our case, off-white) ceiling. Check!

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

My process for hanging the lights also worked out exactly as planned. First, I laid the strands (sans bulbs) out on the floor to make sure I could cover the area I wanted to, then I used an electric staple gun to put staples into the ceiling every 4-5 feet. After that, I backed the staples out of the ceiling just a bit with a flathead screwdriver so that I could slip the tab of my light bulb sockets through.

I attached every fourth or fifth socket to the ceiling using a staple, the only exception being the area near our ceiling fan. Every single socket was installed flush against the ceiling in that area to avoid the string lights falling into the fan blades while they’re spinning.

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

After all the strands and sockets were connected and attached to the ceiling, I just needed to screw the lightbulbs in to finish. That sentence is so, so, so much easier to say than do. If you catch my drift, this is the part when the entire project almost got derailed.

I’m not sure if it’s the particular brand of string lights that I bought (read: cheap) or what, but I’ve never handled more delicate bulbs in my life. About six or so bulbs in, I dropped my first on the slate floor. Although a big bummer at the time, I told myself that it was an accident to be expected. The worst part about dropping the bulb, though, was how badly it broke after it finished falling. The thing literally exploded all over the place into thousands of tiny shards. I’m not exaggerating.

I remember staring down at the destruction for a beat, sighing heavily, and then climbing down off my step ladder to immediately clean it up. It took about 20 minutes to find and suck up all the glass with my vacuum cleaner, but afterward I was back up on my ladder working my way along the strand with more bulbs. About five bulbs later, it happened again. I was pretty pissed at myself, but just told myself to clean it all up again and be extra careful moving forward.

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

From then on out, I gingerly picked up the bulbs one at a time, stepped at a snail’s pace up the ladder, and never let my hands or fingers off the bulb as I slowly twisted it in place. Guys, I was so careful! Even still, I broke another bulb. The frustration was utterly excruciating, especially considering how much effort it took to clean up all the shards each time. And I swear it wasn’t just me and my clumsy motor skills—the bulbs exploded even when dropped onto a soft surface. I think the glass on the bulbs was just that flimsy and thin.

I’ll never be able to fully convey the depth of my despair when one of the connections between the strands came undone, sending an entire line of bulbs down to the brick wall where they exploded in multiple places over my cleaned and re-cleaned floors and furniture.

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

Somehow I managed to get all of the strands and bulbs in place and connected, but I am absolutely terrified now of going into the room for fear that some freak of nature will send the bulbs down to their doom. I should probably go back in and take them down, but I’m pretty darn nervous about even breathing on those sockets and bulbs, let alone spending another few hours handling them.

The problem is that they do look really nice when all lit up. So, I’m going to ask you guys. Do I suck up my anxiety and leave them in place, or suck up my pride and take them down? I think the thing to do if you want to try this at home is to keep these types of lights to outdoor areas only over grass so that, if one falls, you’re not dealing with solid flooring and indoor textiles. I’d love to know your thoughts, so feel free to share them in the comments below. In the meantime, I’ll just be sitting here admiring our lovely lit-up sunroom from afar through these photos.

Café String Lights In A Sunroom

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DIY Paper Plant With Grid Planter Pot

DIY Paper Plant With Grid Planter Pot

Oh, how I wish I had a green thumb! Being able to garden (or even just keep a few indoor potted plants alive) is right up there with sewing for me in terms of skills I’d like to learn. We definitely have some live greenery in our house, but, as you may remember, we also are the proud owners of quite a few fake ones, too. In my opinion, faux greenery is totally fine to enjoy if it makes you happy, and I’ve taken that opinion just onnnnnne step further with my latest DIY craft for Oriental Trading Company. Meet my new pair of DIY Paper Potted Plants.

DIY Paper Plant With Grid Planter Pot

Oddly enough, the inspiration for today’s project was this photo, which I happened to spot in Emily Henderson’s bathroom. Random inspiration really is my absolute favorite thing. Anyway, hop over to OTC’s Fun365 website to find out how to make your own paper plants (printable templates included), and while there you’ll learn how to get the look of my grid planter pots, too. Now, I’d love to know…which of the two types of paper plants is your favorite? Straight edged leaves or notched?

DIY Paper Plant With Grid Planter Pot

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DIY Hanging Herb Plant Garden

DIY Hanging Herb Plant Garden

Just think how impressed your favorite celebrity chef would be if they could see your very own handmade hanging herb garden suspended from the ceiling in your kitchen—at least that’s what I like to imagine when I spot ours out of the corner of my eye. Do you think Ina would give it a satisfied smirk of approval? I’ve got my fingers crossed. Anyway, my DIY Hanging Herb Plant Garden is the most recent afternoon craft that I put together for Hunker, and you can see the whole 7-step process for making your own here.

DIY Hanging Herb Plant Garden

Have you had much success with growing your own herbs? I think the main reason I’ve put a project like this off for so long is the fact that I just forget that we even have fresh herbs to cut from. My habit is to reach inside our dried herbs drawer in the kitchen, but I’d love to get better about making the most of our brand new collection of fresh potted herbs. I went all out at our local nursery in honor of our DIY Hanging Herb Plant Garden, grabbing everything from chives and rosemary, to ‘Crimson King’ basil and chocolate mint. Tell me below: what are your favorite fresh herbs to tend (and use!) at home?

DIY Hanging Herb Plant Garden

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What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

Wow. I can hardly believe I’m even able to type “my fourth pottery class” into a blog post title. I literally came home from my first class at Make Waynesboro clay studio with tears in my eyes because I thought I was simply that bad at it, so to find myself (eight months later!) still doing it each and every week feels like a major accomplishment. That’s not at all to say that I think I’ve completely mastered this art. I have a long, long way to go. But the fact that I can make any shape period is worthy of celebration in my book.

Anyway, today I wanted to share my latest batch of work, including one of my all-time favorite pieces and my least favorite piece, too. I’d also love to entice you into scrolling all the way to the bottom of this post because I have a really exciting pottery-related announcement to make—two of them, actually! I hope you enjoy.

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

First up, I have two new mugs to add to my collection. These two are the only ones I’ve made since January that actually hold a full cup of coffee, so that’s pretty thrilling in and of itself. I now keep the brown one on my shelf at the pottery studio for sips in between work. The two-tone mug is my current go-to at home. If you look closely, you’ll see a subtle leaf design that I had carved into the clay before glazing. I wish I hadn’t bothered with the leafy lines, though, because I really like the drippy glaze by itself. You can’t win ’em all, can you?

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

A couple of new splattered pieces also made the cut—one thin-necked bottle and a plain cup. To be quite honest, I hate the way the cup came out. It also has a subtle leafy pattern drawn into the clay, but you can’t see it because I overdid on the glaze splatters. It’s still functional, but I’m embarrassed to even show it to you, so let’s just move on, shall we?

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

For some reason, I tend to default to bottles, vases, and cups when I sit down to a pottery wheel, so I don’t make many bowls. That said, I like the way this little one came out, so maybe I need to commit to making more this season. You might recognize the colorful glaze circles design from a cup I made in my last batch of finished pottery.

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

The minty green floral cup you see above is probably the one piece I’m most excited about thus far. It’s not particularly unique and the shape isn’t all that complicated, but there’s something about the color and the organic petaled stems that “get” me. I think it probably has a lot to do with the fact that I focused on drawing back in art school, so the idea of drawing on top of clay is sort of like the best of my two favorite worlds: my old art school drawing days, and my new pottery lifestyle.

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

This go around I also experimented a bit with really simplified pieces, in both their colors and forms. The three pieces you see pictured above are a few other favorites of mine. They’ll be hard to part with if (when?) I open a shop to sell my pottery.

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

Now, about that double-belly shape…I’ve been desperate to make a really solid curvy bottle at the wheel, but had the hardest time making my vision come to life. The piece you see just below was my first attempt, while the piece above was my second. Click here to see the shape I’m going for, but essentially it’s a wide bottle with a tight area in the middle (giving it that “double-bellied” shape) and a tall neck. As you can see, I didn’t get even close to a tall neck, but the extra curvy silhouette is at least starting to form up. Stay tuned as I keep at it!

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

So, about those announcements. First, I’m excited to share that I’m now a full-time member of the studio and go in about three times a week for a few hours each time. And, second, I’m also now working as a studio assistant for the owners, which means that I help keep things tidy around the studio and assist with things like firing and other little projects here and there. I’m absolutely over the moon to have the opportunity to learn anything and everything I can, so these two things feel like major steps in the right direction.

I’m really grateful to the studio owners for putting their trust in me (not to mention, putting up with my over-enthusaism), and I also can’t thank you guys enough for your support. Your encouragement means the world, and I can’t wait to share more about the shop I hope to open online soon so you can snap up these pieces for your own home. Now tell me in the comments below: which piece if your favorite?

What I Made In My Fourth Pottery Class

*At the risk of making you go cross-eyed from all the pottery talk…you can see pieces from my very first collection here, look through my second batch by clicking this link, and you can peruse my third bunch here.
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DIY Wood And Metal Ladder Shelf

DIY Wood And Metal Ladder Shelf

It seems that my love for leaning book and magazine storage knows no end, because I’m back with another tutorial for Hunker teaching you how to do just that. First, I built a leaning wooden ladder from scratch, then I moved on to a simple plywood design. Today, I’m sharing my take on a DIY Wood And Metal Ladder Shelf that’s made using two slightly unlikely supplies: off-the-shelf wood boards and metal towel bars.

DIY Wood And Metal Ladder Shelf

Hop over to Hunker for the full step-by-step craft tutorial, which includes everything you need to know to build your own leaning magazine ladder, including a supply list and tips for measuring and making sure your finished ladder is as strong and level as can be. Now, tell me below: what was the last woodworking project you tackled? If you don’t have an answer to that question and are intimidated by the idea of working with a saw and drill, I can’t help but think that this project is a great way to test the waters. I know you can do it!

DIY Wood And Metal Ladder Shelf

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DIY Candle-Making At Home

*This post was sponsored by LAB & CO

DIY Candle-Making At Home

If I had to name just one DIY project that I’ve always wanted to learn how to do, it would definitely be candle-making. The project has been at the top of my must-try list for years—since before I even launched this blog seven years ago! The only excuse I can give for waiting so long to give it a shot is intimidation. I’ve always imagined the process of candle-making to involve a lot of tedious steps and maybe even a little bit of danger since melted hot wax is involved.

Well, as you can probably guess from the title of today’s post, I finally, FINALLY crossed this crafting to-do off my list. The other exciting news to report is that it’s not even close to hard to pull off at home. I had completely blown everything out of proportion in my mind because candle-making is easy, relatively quick, and, frankly, a whole lot safer than some other DIY projects I’ve worked on. Scroll on to learn more about the process I went through (including a new video!) with a little help from LAB & CO.

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

Here’s What You’ll Need:

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

Step One

Carefully clean the inside of your vessels using a damp rag or paper towel. Allow the vessels to dry out completely while working on the next step.

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

Step Two

Cut wax into chunks using a knife, and place them in a pouring pot. Boil water in a large traditional pot on the stove, then loop the handle of the pouring pot over the side of the traditional pot. The wax will start to melt over the boiling water, so be sure to regulate the heat with a candle thermometer. Your thermometer will either come with instructions that detail the right temperature to shoot for, or (if your thermometer is like the one I used) the side will be marked to the ideal temperature and you can just keep an eye on that.

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

Step Three

While the wax is melting on the stove, slide your first wooden wick into a clip. Press a wick sticker on the bottom of the clip and remove the protective film on the very bottom. Press this now-sticky side to the inside center of your vessel, and repeat on however many candles you plan to make. If you don’t have wick stickers, note that double-sided tape works in a pinch.

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

Step Four

Once the wax is completely melted and has reached the ideal temperature, remove the pouring pot from the heat and set it on a heat-resistant trivet. Next, gently pour fragrance into the melted wax, and whisk for 120 seconds.

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

Step Five

Pour the fragrant melted wax slowly into each of your vessels, stopping about 1/2 an inch or 1 inch from the top. Let the candles cool for 24 hours before handling to allow the wax to fully harden.

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

Step Six

Cut the wicks down using wick trimmers, then light your candles to finish. Note that you’ll want to trim your wicks down pretty close to the surface of the wax. I left mine too long (about 1 full inch showing above the wax) and had to blow them out and re-trim because the wicks were smoking too much when lit. Cut your own wicks to a 3/16-inch height for a nice, even burn.

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

And that, my friends, is all there is to it! Candle-making is positively addicting once you get over the myth that it’s too complicated to try at home. In fact, I had enough extra wax left over that I turned a few of my favorite pieces of handmade pottery into candles while I was at it.

I really wish I could let you smell these candles through the screen, too, because the scent is pretty much pure joy. I have the big gold one burning right here beside me as I type this, and I swear it’s making my day at least 20 percent better.

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

Click ‘Play’ on that video above (or hop over to YouTube here) to watch the whole simple process in action, and then let me know in the comments if you’ve ever given candle-making a try at home. Was it as hard as you thought it would be? Check out the LAB & CO website for more how-to resources, plus a whole shop full of supplies. Happy candle-making!

DIY Candle-Making At Home | dreamgreendiy.com + @woodenwickco #ad

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DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

My friend Bethany Mallory, of the Farmhaus on Main fame, is back this morning to share more flower-arranging tips and tricks. Last time, if you remember, she focused on teaching us how to create homemade foraged centerpieces, but today it’s all about single-bloom arranging. We spent the afternoon wandering the Farmhaus gardens, and came away with an armload of beautiful cut hydrangea stems. Keep reading for Bethany’s tips, and see my step-by-step photos of her show-stopping single-bloom centerpiece.

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

Think Big

These types of arrangements are best created using flower varieties that have oversized silhouettes and petals (think: hydrangeas, peonies, etc.). Stems that have smaller blooms will need to be tightly packed and you’ll need a lot of them to fill the vase, so that’s why we opted to use oversized hydrangeas to build our single-bloom centerpiece. Just a few go a long way.

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

Camouflage Your Foraging

Snip the flowers off the bush or tree below the foliage line near a leaf. This clipping technique hides where you cut out the stems, and allows you to avoid giving the remaining bush a chopped look for the rest of the green season.

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

Make It Last

Before placing your stems into a jar, cut them at an angle. This maximizes the amount of water that can get into the flowers for longer tabletop life. Make sure to remove all leaves toward the bottom of the stem, too, so that none are submerged in the water. Leaves left below the waterline often mold and contaminate the water, making the arrangement go bad much faster.

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

But First, Plan Your Cuts

Cut your first stem (remember: at an angle at the bottom!) so that the bloom sits right at the top rim of the vase or jar. Then, hold each stem up to the vase in turn to measure and cut so that the finished arrangement is tightly packed and uniform.

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

Tying It All Together

When finished cutting the stems you need to fill the vase, carefully lift the blooms together as one unit out of the vase, and use something like a rubber band, ribbon, or even an elastic hair tie to tightly wrap the stems together in a bundle just under the blooms. This will allow the finished arrangement to hold its shape better for longer.

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

One more note? Put your arrangement (jar and all) into the refrigerator overnight when it’s not in view to make it last longer. Cut stems love chilly environments. Thanks again to Bethany for sharing her flower-arranging tips. Here’s that link again to the first feature with tons of foraged flower ideas if you missed it, and be sure to leave your own floral advice in the comments below. Now, go take advantage of fresh flowers while they last this summer!

DIY Single-Bloom Flower Arrangement

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DIY Metallic Gold Geo Disc Object​

DIY Metallic Gold Geo Disc Object​

This project is one of those that has been on my mind for a reallllllly long time. The inspiration for it struck almost two years ago after taking a virtual tour of designer Ginny Macdonald’s living room. I thought the metallic gold disc object on her coffee table was just so eye-catching, and it occurred to me that I could get the look using wooden round pieces from the craft store and gold paint.

Fast forward to this summer and my editor at Hunker was all for the idea, so I put together a quick tutorial detailing the process in case you want to try it for yourself. As with most little decorative DIYs like this one, it has moved from room to room, vignette to vignette—I just can’t, for the life of me, choose one spot. The good news is that it looks pretty practically anywhere I style it (I’m not taking any credit for that, by the way—it’s just inherently such a classic, versatile design!).

DIY Metallic Gold Geo Disc Object​

DIY Metallic Gold Geo Disc Object​

For now, though, my metallic gold sculpture is looking great in our recently revamped guest room (which is another project I can’t wait to tell you more about). Click over to Hunker for the full tutorial, and tell me about a decorative designer object you’ve always wanted to DIY in the comments below.

DIY Metallic Gold Geo Disc Object​

*See more of my original crafting and decorating stories for Hunker here.
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How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

Fall will always and forever be my very favorite season (two months to go!), but that said I happily look forward to the flowery mid-year months, too. Spring and summer are always full of colorful blooms here in Virginia, especially at our neighborhood coffee shop, the Farmhaus on Main.

So, when its owner, my pal Bethany Mallory, offered to take me on a walking tour of the ‘Haus gardens and teach me how to make a foraged flower arrangement, I was quick to respond with an emphatic “yes!” Scroll on for Bethany’s flower-picking tips, and see the arrangement come to life through my camera, one stem at a time.

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

Choose Blooms Wisely

Cut stems in odd numbers by flower type so that the finished arrangement feels organic and not so contrived. In other words, cut 1 stem or 3 stems of each flower rather than 2 or 4. We’re not sure of the visual science here, but trust us—your arrangement will look more authentically “foraged” this way.

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

Walk & Arrange

Carry the bundle around with you while cutting individual stems, that way you can place the flowers together right away and get a preview of what the finished arrangement will look like. Stop cutting when the bundle looks full and has enough good variety in terms of height and color.

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

Longevity Is Key

Get familiar with flower varieties before cutting to ensure your arrangement will last more than a day or two. For example, blooms like Day Lilies only last a few hours when cut, so it’s best to leave them on the bush where they will happily bloom for weeks at a time.

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

All About Composition

Place your stems one at a time in the vase, turning the vessel as you go so that the arrangement is pretty from all angles, front and back. Once your flowers are all in place, fill in with trailing greenery. These leafy branches help break up the color a bit and puts even more emphasis on the statement flowers, acting almost like a picture frame to the arrangement as a whole.

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

Big thanks to Bethany from the Farmhaus for letting us forage around in their café garden, and for her help teaching us how to make the most of summer blooms. While I’m not sure I’ll ever have a proper flower garden at our own house, I’m now feeling much more confident about pulling something pretty together using flower bundles from the market. Leave your own foraged flower arranging tips in the comments below if you have them!

How To Make A Foraged Flower Arrangement

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